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An Exhaustive Checklist for Winterizing Your Home

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Even without Game of Thrones on the air, we all know it to be true: winter is coming. And with it comes plenty of cold weather, rain, snow, and ice. As a homeowner, that means it’s time to turn on the heat and grab some firewood, but there’s another task that’s equally important before the first snowfall: winterizing your home. It’s a big task, and it’s easy to forget some of the many things you need to do to winterize, so we’ve put together a complete list of everything you need to do to keep your home winter-ready.

Your Checklist for Winterizing Your Home

Winterizing the Outside of Your Home

  1. Clear out your gutters. Remove any debris, branches, or acorns.
  2. Buy a snow shovel, and keep it inside your home or garage. You never know when the snow will pile up so high you can’t make it to the shed.
  3. Install a storm door.
  4. Install storm windows, too.
  5. Caulk any cracks around the outside of your windows and doors.
  6. Paint a fresh coat of sealing paint on your deck to protect it from winter weather.
  7. Put your outdoor furniture in storage. (Need a hand? Use Dolly to get that furniture inside!)
  8. Speaking of bringing things inside…roll your grill inside (or at least put your propane tank somewhere away from the elements).
  9. Wrap any immobile outdoor furniture in tarps and hold down with bungee cords.
  10. If you live in a high-moisture area, scrape any moss or excess vegetation off your roof to avoid buildup in the wetter months.
  11. Close any outdoor vents that may have been opened in the summertime.
  12. Disconnect your garden hoses and any sprinklers. Store them for the winter and make sure your spouts are shut all the way off.
  13. If you have a sprinkler system, turn it off for the season.
  14. Put stakes around the edge of your driveway if you plan on getting it plowed in the winter.
  15. …And put up stakes for other important fixtures in your yard that may get buried in snow and become a tripping hazard.
  16. Check the areas around any downspouts to make sure they’re clear of rocks and debris.

Winterizing the Inside of Your Home

  1. Insulate pipes that run through your attic and other non-heated areas (you’ll want to do this on any outdoor pipes, too).
  2. Set up draft guards on any doors that go outside.
  3. Seal off your fireplace (unless you plan to use it during the winter).
  4. Check for cracks near the indoor frames of windows or doors. If you see them, caulk them just as you would outside.
  5. Set up a digital thermostat that automatically reduces the heat when you’re out of the house and warms it back up when you get home.
  6. Check your garage and attic for any leaks. Better to find them now before it starts getting icy!
  7. Check the temperature on your hot water tank and make sure it’s not exceeding its maximum.
  8. Find the direction switch on your ceiling fans and turn them counter-clockwise. This will redirect warm air down instead of moving cold air throughout the room.
  9. Check your dryer vent to make sure it’s not clogged up, and if it is, get it professionally cleaned.
  10. Replace the filter in your furnace (and check on any other filters around the house).
  11. Open the vents for your heating system.
  12. Get your heavy blankets and winter sheets out of storage (get help fromĀ Dolly if you need some muscle and a truck). Give them a good wash with hot water to clear off any built-up dust or pollen.
  13. Change the batteries on your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

Transforming your house for winter can be a lot of work. Dolly’s here to help make it easy. Whether it’s moving your outdoor furniture into the garage or breaking your warm-weather gear out of storage, we’re here to help with all the heavy lifting you need while winterizing your home. Our background-checked Helpers are masters of heavy lifting, and will treat your home with the same respect you do. No matter how much winterizing you need to do, Dolly can help make it possible.

Miranda is the Marketing Coordinator at Dolly. She’s moved nine times in the past six years, and while she’s grateful for the moving expertise, she’s hoping she doesn’t need to move a tenth time anytime soon.

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